Post-Impressionism

 

Post-Impressionism is a term coined in 1910 by the English art critic and painter Roger Fry to describe the reaction against the naturalistic depiction of light and colour in different types of art movements like Impressionism. Led by Paul Cézanne, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, and Georges Seurat, who all developed a personal, distinctive style, were unified by their interest in expressing their emotional and psychological responses to the world through bold colors and expressive, often symbolic images.